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Regulations of the Faculty of the School of Law University of California, Davis

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Article 1 - Course of Study for J.D. Degree

To earn a J.D. degree a student must:
A. pass all required courses;
B. earn 88 semester credits;
C. complete six semesters in residence;
D. have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 at the end of the final semester;
E. satisfy the skills requirement of paragraph 1.4B and the writing requirement of paragraph 1.4C.

Students earn credits by:
A. passing courses at this school (one credit is given for 15 hours of classroom instruction or its equivalent);
B. satisfactorily completing courses in other parts of this university (See paragraph 1.7 and paragraph 1.8).

To complete a semester of residence, a student must earn at least 10 credits in one semester. If a student earns less than 10 credits in a semester, the student must take an extra semester and earn enough credits to total 10. For example, if a student earns only seven credits in a semester, the student must take an extra semester and earn at least three credits. A "semester away" clinical program counts as a semester of residence.

A. The first-year program consists of nine required courses totaling 31 credits. A student may elect to defer a required first-year course (other than Law 200) until the second year if:

(1) the student's undergraduate grade point average as calculated on the LSDAS report is 3.12 or lower, or the student's LSAT score was 157 or below, these numbers to be adjusted yearly to reflect the bottom ten percent of the entering class;

(2) the student's grade point average at the end of the first semester of law studies is 2.0 or below; or

(3) the student receives two or more grades of C- or lower at the end of the first semester.

For purposes of computing the grade point average at the end of the first semester, Law 207, Legal Research and Writing, will not be considered. (See also paragraph 5.5.)

B. Students may elect what courses to take in their second and third years, subject to the following rules:

(1) In either the second or third year a student must take

(a) At least one course which is designated as satisfying instruction in professional responsibility; and

(b) At least one course which is designated as satisfying instruction in professional skills.

(2) Each semester a student must pass enough courses to earn at least 10 credits. Students may not take courses totaling more than 17 credits.

(3) The total credits in Law 408, 409, 410A-B, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 425, 430, 445, 450, 455, 460, 470, 475, 495, 498, and 499 plus the total credits (in excess of two) under paragraphs 1.7, 1.8, and 1.9 may not exceed 16 of the 88 units required for graduation. With the permission of the dean, a student may earn four additional such credits.

(4) With the permission of the dean, a student may earn three regular class credits in conjunction with a clinical semester but may earn no more than 14 total credits during a clinical semester.

(5) The total credits in Law 425, 430, 445, 450, 455, 460, 470, and 475 may not exceed 14 of the 88 units required for graduation.

C. In the second or third year, a student must complete a writing project. This project may take any of several forms, for example, a paper, a brief, a memorandum of law, a proposed statute, a statutory scheme or set of administrative regulations (with explanatory comments), or a will or agreement (with explanatory comments). This means an individually authored work of rigorous intellectual effort of at least 20 typewritten, double spaced pages, excluding footnotes. The requirement may be satisfied in one of the following ways:

(1) Complete a law school seminar or course that requires a writing project. This will be the normal method for meeting the writing requirement. No units in addition to those given for the seminar or course will be given for the writing project.

(2) With the prior consent of the instructor and the dean, complete a writing project in connection with Law 419, Advanced Writing Project (1-4 units), under the active and regular supervision of a faculty member: The student may use prior research (from a law school course, clinical, summer job, moot court work, law review work, or the like) as the starting point for the project, but, if that is done, then the number of units to be awarded for Law 419 must be reduced accordingly.

(3) Complete a student work of membership quality as a writer for the UC Davis Law Review. Jointly authored articles are acceptable providing that the authors can establish to the satisfaction of the faculty law review advisor, that each author's contribution is equivalent to the effort required for an individually authored paper that meets the requirements of this paragraph. No units in addition to those given for law review writing will be given for the writing project.

(4) Complete a brief for the National Moot Court Team, the Traynor Moot Court Competition, or the Jessup International Law Competition. No units in addition to those given for participating in the competition will be given. To be entitled to meet the writing requirement, a member of the team must establish to the satisfaction of the moot court advisor that his or her contribution is equivalent to the effort required for an individually authored paper that meets the writing requirement. The faculty advisor to the moot court program must certify that the brief submitted as a writing meets the writing requirement of paragraph 1.4C.

A. Students must prepare for and attend class regularly. If a student receives written notice of failure to attend class regularly, and the student continues to fail to attend regularly, the instructor has the authority to assign a failing grade. The instructor may send the written notice or request that the Registrar send it. If the instructor sends the notice, a copy should be sent to the Registrar.

B. If class attendance, preparation and participation are to be considered in grading the course, other than as specified in paragraph 1.5 (A), the instructor shall announce that fact in the first or second class meeting.

After the first year, students may take and receive credit for courses at another law school approved by the American Bar Association, subject to the following rules:

A. The student must obtain the prior approval of the dean of this school. The dean may set a maximum number of credits for the courses and may require that the student earn a minimum grade to receive the credit.

B. The student's grade point average at this school must be 2.0 or above.

C. The student's grades in such courses are not counted in computing the grade point average at this school.

After the first year, students may take and receive credit for one or two undergraduate or graduate courses offered in other parts of this university, subject to the following rules:

A. The student must obtain the prior approval of the dean of the law school. The dean may set a maximum number of credits for the course and may require that the student earn a minimum grade to receive the credit.

B. The student cannot have taken the same or a similar course before.

C. The course must advance the student's legal training.

D. The student cannot receive more than five total credits for all such courses.

E. The student's grades in such courses are not counted in computing the grade point average at this school.

Students may work simultaneously toward a degree in law and an advanced degree in another discipline such as business, science, economics, or the social sciences. The work in the other discipline may be taken in another school or in another part of this university. The following rules apply:

A. The student must apply to and be accepted by both this school and the other school or university department.

B. The student must obtain the prior approval of the dean of this school and the head of the other school or university department.

C. The first year of study must be entirely at this school.

D. The student may earn up to ten credits at this school for work completed in the other discipline. The dean of this school may set a maximum number of credits for particular courses and may require that the student earn a minimum grade to receive the credit.

After the first year, students may take and receive credit for courses at a foreign law school, subject to the following rules:

A. The student's course of study must be supervised by a full time faculty member.

B. At least 90 days prior to anticipated enrollment in the foreign law school, the student must request approval from the dean of this school.

C. The dean may set a maximum number of credits for particular courses and may require that the student earn a minimum grade to receive the credit.

D. The student's grade point average at this school must be 2.0 or above.

E. The student's grades in such courses are not counted in computing the grade point average at this school.

A. A student who has successfully completed at least one year of a three-year program at another law school approved by the American Bar Association may apply to transfer to this school. The dean will decide how many credits and semesters of residence will be awarded for the work at the former school.

B. Any person may apply to the dean to take courses at this school without being a candidate for the J.D. degree.

Students should plan to devote substantially all of their time to their law studies and related activities. Students shall not undertake remunerative employment in excess of 20 hours a week.

Article II - Examinations and Written Work for J.D. Degree

Unless the instructor announces otherwise, a written final examination will be given at the end of each course.

A. Students must be present for the final examination at its regularly scheduled time unless excused by the dean. Absent exceptional circumstances, the student must request and receive the excuse in advance of the scheduled examination. The dean may excuse a student from the regularly scheduled examination and permit the student to take an examination at another time if:

(1) The student has two regularly scheduled examinations on the same day and the student requests at least 10 days before the beginning of the examination period to have one of them rescheduled; or

(2) The dean concludes that the student is too ill to take the examination at the regularly scheduled time; or

(3) The dean concludes that an unforeseen, extraordinary circumstance, such as a death in the immediate family, would make it unduly burdensome for the student to take the examination at the regularly scheduled time.

B. To reschedule an examination earlier than its regularly scheduled time, the dean must have the consent of the instructor. To reschedule an examination later than its regularly scheduled time, the dean must notify the instructor immediately of the delay and, at the earliest possible time, of the date and time at which the examination will be administered.

A. All examinations are governed by the honor system. See paragraph 2.4.

B. Blue-covered examination answer booklets will be supplied by the Law School. Students may not bring any blue books into the examination room and may not take any blue books out of the examination room. The Law School will also provide typing paper to students who type their examinations.

C. Students may not bring any written material into the examination room unless (l) the instructor announces otherwise in advance, and (2) the instructions on the examination paper state that students may refer to written materials during the examination.

D. In order to permit timely distribution of examination materials, students must be seated in the examination room at least 10 minutes before the start of the examination.

E. Examinations are identified by an anonymous number system. Students shall write their examination number on each of their answer booklets and on their question sheets; and shall not write their names on either. Answer booklets shall be labeled serially, i.e., "Book 1 of 2, Book 2 of 2," etc. Students shall not write anything else until the administrator tells students to start the examination.

F. Students are permitted to write their examination answers on a computer in the examination room under rules and restrictions established by the dean.

G. Students who leave the room during the examination may not take their question sheets or answer booklets with them.

H. Except as stated above, students shall not begin to write until the administrator tells the students to start. When the administrator announces that the time is up, students must stop writing immediately even if in mid-sentence. Answer booklets and question sheets shall be placed one inside the next and turned in immediately to the administrator. The administrator will not accept the answer booklets of students who violate these time rules; such students must turn them in at the dean's office where the violation will be noted on the cover of the answer booklets. If a student violates these time rules, the instructor must lower the grade by the amount the instructor deems justified in the circumstances.

I. After receiving the grade in a course, a student may look over the final examination. Final examinations are kept on file for one year; after one year they are destroyed unless the instructor or the dean directs otherwise.

J. Law students whose native language is not English and who have no previous study experience of at least one year in the English language shall be granted additional time for written examinations. The additional time shall be 20 minute per regular exam hour.

A. Unless the instructor announces otherwise, all written work at this school is governed by the honor system.

B. Under the honor system students may neither give nor receive aid on written work.

C. Any student who learns that another student has violated the honor system should report the violation to a member of the faculty or to the dean.

D. Violations of the honor system will be treated in accordance with university disciplinary procedures.

Article III - Grades for J.D. Degree

All courses, except those listed in paragraph 3.2, are graded by the following table of letter grades and numerical grade point equivalents:

Grade Points
A+ or A     4.0
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0
C- 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0
D- 0.7
F 0.0
I (See paragraph 3.5)

The grade of “A+” may be awarded for extraordinary achievement, and will be recorded on the student’s transcript, but will be counted as an “A” when computing a student’s grade point average.

The following courses are graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory:  Law 200, 234, 239, 244, 258A, 263, 280, 408, 409, 410A-B, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 425, 430, 445, 450, 455, 460, 470, 475, 495, and 498.  Law 419 and 499 may be graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory, or with a letter grade, at the instructor's discretion.  If an instructor wants to grade any other course Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory, he or she must obtain faculty approval before the course begins.

After the end of each semester students receive a cumulative grade point average for all of their work at this school.  This average is computed by dividing the total grade points by the number of credits earned plus the number of credits assigned to any course in which an F was received.  Work in other law schools or other parts of this university is not included in the grade point average.

A. F is a failing grade. Students who receive an F in a course do not earn any credits for that course.

B. Students who receive an F in an elective course may repeat the course with the dean's permission. Students who receive an F in a required course must repeat the course. Both the F grade and the grade received upon repeating the course will be used to compute the cumulative grade point average except for courses repeated under Article IV.

A. The grade I means "incomplete." An instructor may give an I only when a student's work is of passing quality but is incomplete for good cause determined by the instructor. Good cause does not include extensions of time granted for convenience.

B. A student who receives an I in a course must complete the work within the time specified by the instructor, but in no event later than the last day of the second succeeding semester in which the student is in residence at the school. When the student satisfactorily completes the course work, the instructor will change the I to a regular grade, and the student will receive credit for the course.

C. Students who do not satisfactorily complete the course work within the time limit will receive no credit for the course, and the I will be treated as an F in computing the grade point average.

D. An I received in a student's final semester will be treated as an F in determining whether the student has met the requirements for graduation.

All grades except Incomplete or In Progress are final when filed by the instructor.  The petition of a student seeking to have a grade changed shall be referred to an ad hoc committee of the faculty for decision without appeal. A grade may be changed only for the correction of a clerical or procedural error. No change of grade may be made on the basis of reassessment of the quality of a student's work or, with the exception of Incomplete or In Progress grades, the completion of additional work. No term grade except Incomplete may be revised by reexamination. The ad hoc committee shall be comprised of three faculty members, selected by random drawing from the voting faculty (excluding the instructor involved). After hearing the matter and making its determination, the ad hoc committee shall report its action to the faculty and shall thereupon be discharged.

It is the sense of the faculty that inequity in grading in the first-year sectioned courses should be avoided. In first-year sectioned courses, not including legal research and writing courses, faculty members should distribute grades as follows:

A+, A, A- 20 percent (plus or minus 3 percent)
B+, B, B- 60 percent (plus or minus 3 percent)
C+ and below 20 percent (plus or minus 3 percent)

No faculty member shall sign a grade report deviating from this distribution without attaching thereto a written explanation of the reason for the deviation. Faculty members grading courses that are subject to this prescribed distribution are encouraged within the prescribed parameters to distribute grades such that the mean of the grades awarded, expressed as GPA, is 3.0 plus or minus 0.1.

For the legal research and writing courses, faculty should distribute grades as follows:

A, A- 20 percent
B+, B 55 percent
B-, C+ 20 percent
C and below 5 percent

No faculty member shall sign a grade report deviating from this distribution without attaching thereto a written explanation of the reason for the deviation. The mean of the grades awarded shall not be more than 3.3 and not less than 3.0; grades lower than a C are not factored into the mean.

Article IV - Disqualification and Reinstatement for J.D. Degree

A student is in good standing if his or her cumulative grade point average at the end of the second, fourth, sixth or final semester is 2.0 or above.  The grade point average is computed to the nearest tenth; numbers .050 and above will be rounded off to the next highest tenth.

A student whose cumulative grade point average at the end of the second semester is below 2.0, but not below 1.7, will be on academic probation and subject to the following conditions:

A. If the cumulative grade point average is 1.8 or above, the student must repeat each course in which a grade of D+ or lower was received. The student may elect to repeat any course in which a grade of C- was received.

B. If the cumulative grade point average is less than 1.8, the student must repeat the entire first-year curriculum. The student may elect not to repeat up to five units in which a grade of C or higher was received. In addition, the dean may exempt a student from repeating Introduction to Law and/or Legal Research and Writing, if the student received a grade of C or higher in the course, and if the dean determines that repetition of the course would not significantly contribute to the student's legal education.

C. The dean must approve the student's study list before the end of the first week of classes each semester. The maximum course load permitted for a student who is on academic probation is 15 units per semester.

D. The student must attend class regularly as required by paragraph 1.5.

E. Students who are on probation will be disqualified from law school if their grade point average at the end of their fourth semester (i.e., at the end of the probationary year) is below 2.0. No petition for reinstatement will be considered if a student is disqualified after two semesters on academic probation, except if the student is disqualified in his or her sixth or final semester.

Except as provided in paragraph 4.2, a student will be disqualified if the student's cumulative grade point average is below 2.0 at the end of the second, fourth, sixth or final semester.

Students who are disqualified may petition the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty for reinstatement, which may be granted pursuant to the following criteria and conditions, unless the inability to do satisfactory work is sufficiently manifest that reinstatement would inculcate false hopes, constitute economic exploitation or deleteriously affect the education of other students.

A. Criteria

(1) Within Two Years of Disqualification

Petitions for reinstatement in the two years following disqualification will be granted only if in the judgment of the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty the student makes an affirmative showing that the student possesses the requisite ability and capacity to complete his or her studies at this school, and that exceptional circumstances prevented the student from demonstrating such ability and capacity. Factors such as an over-commitment to extracurricular activities will not be considered "exceptional circumstances."

(2) Two Years or More After Disqualification

Petitions for reinstatement two or more years after disqualification may be granted in the discretion of the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty if, in its judgment, the nature of the student's work, activities or studies during the interim indicate a substantially stronger potential for law study and success in completion of his or her studies at this school. Petitions must include a detailed description of the student's work, activities, and studies since disqualification.

(3) Subsequent Disqualification

No petition for reinstatement will be considered if a student is academically disqualified for a second time at any time after initial reinstatement, except that students disqualified at the end of their sixth or final semester may petition the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty for permission to return for one or more additional semesters of study to complete requirements for graduation.

B. Conditions of Reinstatement by Petition

If the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty grants a petition for reinstatement, it may in its discretion impose any conditions reasonably related to the student's academic performance. Petitions will rarely be granted without imposition of conditions. Conditions that may be imposed include the following:

(1) Repetition of any or all courses in which the student received a grade of C- or below, or a grade of Unsatisfactory.

(2) Repetition of the entire first-year curriculum. This condition is mandatory if a student is disqualified at the end of the second semester.

(3) Any other conditions reasonably relevant to the perceived situation that produced the disqualification or to rectification of the student's academic position.

C. Petitions

Petitions for reinstatement after disqualification in the spring semester must be filed in the dean's office no later than 20 days after the date of written notification of disqualification. Petitions for reinstatement after disqualification in the fall semester shall be filed within 10 days of the date of written notification of disqualification. Petitions should include a statement of facts demonstrating that the student meets the criteria set forth in 4.4A, and a statement of any conditions the student believes should be imposed under 4.4B, particularly as to any courses the student wishes to repeat.

D. Hearings

(1) Reinstatement petitions will be heard by the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty. The committee will schedule a hearing on a petition as soon as is practicable after receipt of the petition. Students are entitled to appear before the committee and may be accompanied by a representative. Determinations of the committee are by majority vote. The dean who is the committee chair, shall not have a vote. Decisions of the committee are not appealable.

(2) Students may ask to remove up to two members of the committee without stating a reason.

The law school transcript will reflect all grades that are received. On repeated courses, however, only the later grade will be used to compute the cumulative grade point average.

If a student repeats a course, only those credits earned on the second taking of the course will be counted toward the requirements for the J.D. degree.

Depending upon the number of courses to be repeated, the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty in its discretion may authorize or require that a student extend his or her academic program over a maximum period of four years not including semesters on academic probation prior to disqualification.

Article V - Altering the Academic Program for J.D. Degree

A. During the first eight calendar days of the semester in which a course begins, a student may drop or add the course by web registration.

B. After the eight-day period students may drop or add a course only with the dean's approval, which will be given only in exceptional cases.

After the first year students may apply to the dean for planned educational leave.  Planned educational leave is defined by university regulations as a pause in a student's formal education to permit the student to clarify educational goals, gain job experience, mature, gain self-knowledge, or solve personal problems, so that the student may return with greater prospects of academic success.  Further information about planned educational leave is available in the administrative office.

Students who wish to withdraw from school on or before the last class day of a semester, shall give the dean's office a notice of withdrawal and a statement of the reasons for withdrawal.  Students may not withdraw after the last class day of a semester without the dean's permission.  Students will receive no grades or credits for the semester in which they withdraw.

A. Students who withdraw from school after completion of their first semester may petition the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty for readmission. In exercising its discretion to readmit, the committee will consider, among other things, the timing and reasons for the withdrawal, the activities after withdrawal, and the prospects of successfully completing law school. Petitions under this rule are granted only in exceptional circumstances. In granting a petition the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty may, in its discretion, impose the conditions contained in paragraph 4.4.

B. Students who seek to withdraw for non-academic reasons before completion of their first semester may petition the Dean to be permitted to return as an entering first-year student no later than the next academic year. If such a withdrawing student wishes to return after the succeeding academic year, he or she must apply as an entering student; the application will be given no preference over those of other applicants.

Normally students must take enough courses each semester to graduate in three years. Students who face serious hardship caused by finances, family responsibilities, or the like, may seek the dean's permission, at any time after acceptance to the school, to take a reduced course load for one or more semesters, thereby extending their academic program over a maximum of four years (or a maximum of five years in the case of students who extend their academic program and who are granted a Planned Educational Leave pursuant to paragraph 5.2). Students must earn at least 10 credits per semester and meet the grade point requirements stated in paragraph 4.1. Not more than five percent of the total student body may take a reduced course load under this rule at any one time.

Article VI - Course of Study for LL.M. Degree

To earn an LL.M. degree, a graduate law student must:

A. pass all required courses;

B. earn twenty semester credits;

C. complete two semesters in residence;

D. if a graduate of a United States law school, write a graded thesis having a semester credit value of between four to eight units; or

E. if a graduate of a foreign law school, write an analytically rigorous legal research paper, either as part of a seminar or for an independent study project worth at least two semester units of credit, which is completed within the two semesters of the graduate program and is equivalent in quality and substance to the writing project required of candidates for the J.D. degree under paragraph 1.4C;

F. have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 at the end of the program. The grade point average shall be determined on the basis of letter grades. This rule applies even for LL.M. students who elect "Satisfactory"/ "Unsatisfactory" grading as provided in paragraph 6.3D or paragraph 6.3E. The grade point average is computed to the nearest tenth; numbers 0.50 and above will be rounded off to the next highest tenth.

A. For graduates of United States law schools, the graduate law program consists of elective courses and a thesis together comprising twenty semester units of credit.

B. For graduates of foreign law schools, the graduate law program consists of two required courses, or their equivalent, worth three semester units of credit, and elective courses worth a total of 17 semester units of credit. The required courses are Law 200A, Introduction to the Law of the United States, a one semester, two-unit course; and Law 207, Legal Research, a one-unit course.

C. On a showing that the LL.M. student has already received credit for courses equivalent to the required courses, the LL.M. director may waive either or both of the required courses. If the director waives a required course, the director may require the student to take other courses specially designed for, or of special value to LL.M. students.

D. With the approval of the LL.M. Director and the candidate's faculty advisor, graduates of a foreign law school may, in lieu of the writing requirement contained in 6.1E, write a graded thesis equivalent in quality and substance to a substantial law review article worth between four to eight semester units of credit.

E. Credits earned in an approved LL.M. preparation program may be considered the equivalent of the course entitled Introduction to the Law of the United States, but shall not transfer to reduce the 20 semester units of credit required to earn an LL.M. degree.

F. LL.M. students may enroll in any course. Enrollment in clinical courses requires approval of the instructor and completion of any prerequisite requirements. Students may not receive credit for courses that are substantially similar to courses previously taken at a law school.

G. With the consent of the LL.M. director, and on a showing that the course complements the student's course of study or research, an LL.M. student may enroll in one course (up to three units) offered by University departments outside the law school.

H. The policy on the transfer of UC Davis LL.M. students into the J.D. program is as follows:

(a) UC Davis LL.M. students will be eligible for admission into the J.D. program as transfer students. This policy does not apply to LL.M. students from other law schools or to students in the U.C. Davis LL.M. Program in International Commercial Law.

(b) UC Davis LL.M. students who desire to enter the J.D. program will not be required to take the LSAT.

(c) UC Davis LL.M. students who desire to enter the J.D. program must submit a statement of purpose indicating their reasons for wishing to enter the J.D. program and how completion of the J.D. program will enhance their career goals.

(d) The decision as to whether to accept a UC Davis LL.M. student for transfer into the J.D. program will be made on the basis of the student's academic performance as a UC Davis LL.M. student, the information contained in the student's LL.M. application, the LL.M. student's statement of purpose, and any recommendations that have been submitted by UC Davis professors. A recommendation by a UC Davis professor is not required for a positive decision.

(e) UC Davis LL.M. students and UC Davis LL.M. graduates who are interested in transferring into the J.D. program may request consideration for transfer. Requests for transfer will not be accepted during a UC Davis LL.M. student's first semester nor more than three years after graduating from the UC Davis LL.M. program.

(f) In consultation with the Chair of the Admissions Committee and the Director of the LL.M. program, the Dean shall be responsible for consideration of requests by UC Davis LL.M. students for transfer into the J.D. program.

(g) The primary criterion for acceptance into the J.D. program shall be academic performance at UC Davis during the two semesters of the LL.M year. UC Davis LL.M. students who have not achieved a grade point average of 3.0 at the conclusion of the LL.M. academic year will generally not be accepted. In calculating the grade point for transfer purposes, grades for Introduction to American Law and Legal Research will not be counted. To be eligible for transfer to the J.D. program, UC Davis LL.M. students must have at least 15 units of graded coursework.

(h) UC Davis LL.M. students who are accepted for transfer into the J.D. program will receive credit toward the J. D. degree for all coursework completed during their LL.M. program except Introduction to American Law and Legal Research.

(i) UC Davis LL.M. students accepted for transfer into the J.D. program must take all first year courses except for first year courses completed during their LL.M. year.

(j) UC Davis LL.M. students transferring into the J.D. program must complete all requirements for the J.D. degree no later than 84 months after beginning the LL.M. program.

(k) UC Davis LL.M. students will receive an LL.M. degree upon successful completion of the LL.M. program and will receive a J.D. degree upon successful completion of the J.D. program. UC Davis LL.M. students accepted for transfer into the J.D. program must choose one of the following options:

J.D. Program A:  The former LL.M. student completes all three years of a standard J.D. program.  The former LL.M. student retains the LL.M. degree but receives no credit for any LL.M. course work.

J.D. program B:  UC Davis LL.M. students who are accepted into the J.D. program and who choose this option will be considered holders of the LL.M. degree until completion of the J.D. program.  Because the J.D. degree is based in significant part upon work completed for the LL.M. degree, the LL.M. degree will at the time of graduation from the J.D. program merge completely into the J.D. degree and will no longer exist as an independent degree.

(l) LL.M. students with a J.D. degree from an American law school will be ineligible for transfer into the J.D. program.

(m) The above procedure is the exclusive means by which UC Davis LL.M. students may be admitted to the J.D. program.

I. LL.M. students may not receive credit toward their degree for courses taken at another law school.

A. Unless otherwise provided in this Article, all provisions in Articles II and III regarding examinations, written work, and grades applicable to J.D. students apply as well to LL.M. students.

B. Law students whose native language is not English and who have no previous study experience of at least one year in the English language shall be granted additional time for written examinations. The additional time shall be 20 minutes per regular exam hour.

C. Professors shall grade LL.M. candidates on the same basis as J.D. candidates.

D. Prior to the last day of a semester, LL.M. candidates may elect to receive "Satisfactory"/ "Unsatisfactory" grades instead of a letter grade in any graded course.

E. Upon completing the LL.M. program, LL.M. candidates may elect to have their entire transcript converted to "Satisfactory"/"Unsatisfactory" grading.

F. For purposes of the conversions in paragraphs D and E, all courses for which a J.D. candidate would receive credit will be converted as a "Satisfactory" grade.

G. Beginning in May 2014 and continuing through the conclusion of the Spring 2015 semester, in exceptional cases, the Dean may authorize use of a grading system other than those specified in subsections 6.3C, D, E and F.

A. The provisions of paragraph 5.1 and paragraph 5.3 shall apply to LL.M. students.

B. The normal course of study leading to the LL.M. Degree is one academic year. In exceptional circumstances, with the dean's permission, LL.M. students may extend their course of study. Extensions of time beyond the normal course of study solely for the purpose of completing the writing project required by paragraph 6.1E or a thesis pursuant to paragraph 6.2D may be granted by the dean only for good cause and for a stated period not to exceed the end of the next following semester, provided the faculty member supervising the writing project or thesis and the LL.M. director concur.

C. LL.M. students who withdraw from school before completing the program may petition the LL.M. Admissions Committee for readmission. In exercising its discretion to readmit, the committee will consider, among other things, the timing and reasons for the withdrawal, the activities after withdrawal, and the prospects of successfully completing the LL.M. program. Petitions under this rule are granted only in exceptional circumstances. In granting a petition, the LL.M. Admissions Committee may in its discretion impose the conditions contained in paragraph 4.4B, except that paragraph 4.4B(2) shall not apply.