Events

2022-23 Events

Aoki 1L/Critical Perspectives | Civil Procedure Presents Professor Stacy-Ann Elvy

Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.

 

Aoki 1L/Critical Perspectives | Contracts Presents "Freedom of Contract and Loan Discrimination" with Professor Tom Joo

Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.

 

Aoki Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series | Aidin Castillo Mazantini, Immigration Director

Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom | Register Here

 

The Journey to DACA and Building a Movement for More

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA policy is one of the most significant immigration policies in recent history, with over 800,000 undocumented immigrants receiving protection from deportation and work authorization. The years preceding DACA were marked by record detentions and deportations, and its announcement came on the heels of Congress’ failure to pass the Federal DREAM Act, which would have authorized a path to citizenship for certain undocumented immigrants that came to the U.S. as children. Significantly, the policy was the result of years of advocacy and movement building, led by immigrants directly impacted by the deportation system.

While life-changing, the policy has been limited in its application. It has faced an onslaught of legal challenges that have kept younger generations of undocumented immigrants from receiving similar protections. Today, ten years after the policy was announced, millions of immigrants remain without protection from deportation. This presentation will outline the political and legal context in which DACA emerged, including the speaker’s own journey, pre-DACA, as a formerly undocumented immigrant student, followed by a summary of the ways in which DACA has transformed communities and the national discourse on immigration. It will conclude by offering a perspective on lessons learned from the past.

Adin Castillo Mazantin is Executive Director of the UC Immigrant Legal Services Center, an innovative campus-based and system-wide legal services program launched in 2014 and headquartered at the UC Davis School of Law. The Center provides free immigration legal services to undocumented students and their families at nine UC campuses. Aidin has dedicated her career to removing barriers related to immigration status and to combating immigration detention, enforcement, and criminalization.

Aidin served as Director of the Immigrants’ Rights Practice at Centro Legal de la Raza, one of the largest removal defense programs in California. She oversaw the representation of thousands of immigrants pursuing a broad range of immigration remedies, including complex removal defense, immigrants in detention, and was appointed counsel for immigrants with severe mental disabilities. Under Aidin’s leadership, Centro Legal sued the Trump Administration to prevent its flagrant attempts to erode protections for migrants fleeing violence and persecution.

Aidin previously worked as a policy attorney in Washington, D.C. where she established the Immigrant Legal Resource Center’s national policy office. During that time, she worked with other directly impacted advocates on the implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy, contributed to legislative proposals, and helped author several publications and practice advisories for immigration practitioners. Aidin's experience as a formerly undocumented immigrant and DACA beneficiary, informs her work as an attorney and social justice advocate. She is a graduate of UC Davis and UC Davis School of Law.

Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.

 

Aoki Center and King Hall DEI | A Guide to Civil Procedure | Integrating Critical Legal Perspective

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2022 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom | REGISTER Here

 

"A Guide to Civil Procedure – Integrating Critical Legal Perspectives"

Join the Aoki Center for Critical Race and Nation Studies and UC Davis School of Law’s Committee on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for a conversation with co-contributors of the brand-new book: A Guide to Civil Procedure: Integrating Critical Legal Perspectives.

Hear from contributing authors of the book for an in-depth discussion on how this book, as its description states, “Shines a light on the ways in which civil procedure may privilege—or silence—voices in our justice system.”

In today’s increasingly hostile political and cultural climate, law schools throughout the country are urgently seeking effective tools to address embedded inequality in the United States legal system. A Guide to Civil Procedure aims to serve as one such tool by centering questions of systemic injustice in the teaching, learning, and practice of civil procedure.

Featuring an outstanding group of diverse scholars, the contributors illustrate how law school curriculums often ignore issues such as race, gender, disability, class, immigration status, and sexual orientation. Too often, students view the #MeToo movement, Black Lives Matter, immigration/citizenship controversy, or LGBTQ+ issues as mere footnotes to their legal education, often leading to the marginalization of many students and the production of graduates that do not view issues of systemic injustice as central to their profession.

A Guide to Civil Procedure reveals how procedure is, and always has been, a central pressure point in the struggle to eradicate structural inequality and oppression through the courts. This book will give students and scholars alike a more complex view of their roles as attorneys, sharpen their litigation skills, and provide a stronger sense of community and purpose in the law school classroom.

Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.  

 

Aoki Center and HSI | Professor Danny C. Martinez

Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2022 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303 & via Zoom | REGISTER Here

 

"Leveraging Black and Latinx Youth Ingenuity for Linguistic Solidarity "

 In U.S. public schools Black and Latinx youth have experienced a range of harms brought about by restrictive educational policies and practices. These policies and practices limit how Black and Latinx youth experience their familial and community cultural and linguistic practices in schools. That is, Black and Latinx youth are likely to be viewed as needing remediation when they display communicative practices associated with their racial or ethnic group. This talk will highlight ethnographic data from two respective projects in California high schools where Black and Latinx youth are the majority populations. Through a lens of ingenuity, Martinez will discuss what happens when we forefront ingenuity of Black and Latinx youth in research, over supposed deficits. In doing so, Martinez argues for leveraging of Black and Latinx’ youths’ linguistic flexibility toward a relational understanding of solidarity between these racialized groups. Martinez will present classroom data to make the case that Black and Latinx youth are already engaged in culturally sustaining practices that adults can use to create powerful learning activities that encourage a move toward solidarity. 

Danny C. Martinez, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Language, Literacy and Culture and Chancellors Fellow in the School of Education at the University of California Davis. He is currently the Chair of the Graduate Group in Education. His research has explored the language and literacy practices of Black and Latinx youth in secondary literacy classrooms. Through a recent grant awarded by the Spencer Foundation, Martinez is conducting research with and alongside Teachers of Color in Northern California to explore what cultural and linguistic assets teachers of color bring to their teaching of children and youth of color in our schools. 

Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

 

Ukraine Refugee Crisis and Responses

Friday, Oct. 14, 2022| 8:45 AM - 4:30 PM | King Hall Room 1001 | REGISTER Here

Symposium: "Lessons learned and ways forward for the economics and politics of refugee integration"

 

Jointly sponsored by

  • Economic Assimilation Research Network (Innovation Fund Denmark),
  • UC Davis Global Migration Center
  • UC Davis Aoki Center for Critical Race and Nation Studies

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

 

Aoki 1L/Critical Perspectives | Criminal Law Presents Professor Raquel Aldana

Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.

 

Aoki Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series | Professor Juan Diego Díaz

Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1001 & via Zoom

Juan Diego Díaz, Associate Professor of Music, 2022 Dean's Faculty Fellow, Ph.D. Ethnomusicology, University of British Columbia (2014)

Juan Diego Díaz is an ethnomusicologist with a geographic research interest in Africa and its diaspora, particularly Brazil and West Africa. He explores how African diasporic musics circulate and transform across the Atlantic and how they serve individuals and communities in identity formation. His book Africanness in Action (Oxford University Press, 2021) focuses on how musicians from Bahia, Brazil understand and negotiate essentialist notions about African music and culture. He is also a long-term Capoeira Angola practitioner and has led capoeira, berimbau, and samba ensembles.

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.

 

Aoki Center and HSI | Professor Marcela Cuellar

Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

Marcela Cuellar joined the School of Education in July 2014. She received her doctorate in Higher Education and Organizational Change at the UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies. Her research examines access and equity in higher education, Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) and emerging HSIs, and Latinx student success. More specifically, Dr. Cuellar employs quantitative and qualitative methods to explore Latinx students’ experiences at HSIs and emerging HSIs and how they are empowered as a result of their educational experiences during college and beyond.

For Professor Marcela Cuellar, examining the transformative power of education has been a lifelong passion. “My parents moved to Oxnard, a coastal California town, in the late 1970s to work in the strawberry fields,” said Cuellar. “As the youngest of six children, in addition to Spanish, I learned English from my siblings and had a different trajectory because of it. I was placed into GATE early on, which led me to an advanced track in middle school and high school, and thanks to my experiences as an Upward Bound student, I was the first of my siblings to go straight into a four-year university.”

Cuellar was accepted to multiple schools, eventually choosing Stanford University. “Stanford was a different world than Oxnard,” she said. “I got to see a new world unlike my own and interact with a diverse group of students. It also brought to light how inequitable our backgrounds could be. I could see stark distinctions between where students were coming from and that very few students at Stanford looked like me. When I graduated from college, I knew that I wanted to help other students, especially students from my own community, have access to an education in the way that I had.”  

After completing her bachelor’s degree, Cuellar jumped into working with historically marginalized students at a small Bay Area private school and then became an Upward Bound counselor at San Diego State University. “As I worked with more and more students after college, I started to deeply think about how education systems as a whole were helping students,” she said. “How do high school students transition to four-year universities, and how do universities support their retention? We’re preparing so many students to go to college, but are our colleges ready for them? I had all of these questions, and that led me to graduate school.” She went on to her PhD in Education with a specialization in higher education and organizational change from UCLA.

Her current research examines student experiences and outcomes at Hispanic Serving Institutions, which are institutions where at least 25 percent of undergraduates identify as Latinx. UC Davis recently met the criteria to apply to become a federally designated HSI, and Cuellar served on the campus task force. HSIs can provide real benefits to Latinx students, she said. “I’m particularly interested in the holistic outcomes at HSIs, like levels of civic engagement, student self-perception and pathways to graduate school—the benefits of a college education beyond the grades. For me, higher education was a transformative experience, and it really changed my view of the world and what was possible for my future. I value the potential of higher education, and it is so compelling to hear from students that that is also what they’re seeking—an opportunity to expand their own perspectives and think about their ability to change the world. Grades matter and degrees matter, but there’s so much more to an education. I hope my research makes sure that we don’t lose sight of that.”

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.

 

Aoki Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series | Dr. Jodi Rios, UC Berkeley

Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

Book Talk - Black Lives and Spatial Matters: Policing Blackness and Practicing Freedom in Suburban St. Louis, Cornell University Press, 2020

Black Lives and Spatial Matters is a call to reconsider the epistemic violence that is committed when scholars, policymakers, and the general public continue to frame Black precarity as just another racial, cultural, or ethnic conflict that can be solved solely through legal, political, or economic means. Jodi Rios argues that the historical and material production of blackness-as-risk is foundational to the historical and material construction of our society and certainly foundational to the construction and experience of metropolitan space. She also considers how an ethics of lived blackness—living fully and visibly in the face of forces intended to dehumanize and erase—can create a powerful counter point to blackness-as-risk.

Using a transdisciplinary methodology, Black Lives and Spatial Matters studies cultural, institutional, and spatial politics of race in North St. Louis County, Missouri, as a set of practices that are intimately connected to each other and to global histories of race and race-making. As such, the book adds important insight into the racialization of metropolitan space and people in the United States. The arguments presented in this book draw from fifteen years of engaged research in North St. Louis County and rely on multiple disciplinary perspectives and local knowledge in order to study relationships between interconnected practices and phenomena.

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

 

Aoki Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series | Professor Zoila Mendoza, Native America Studies

Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2023 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

“Quechua Language Revitalization: Activism and Empowerment from Below” ¿Qué te parece? 

For the past couple of years Professor Mendoza been doing more of an activist kind of work in relation to Quechua language revitalization. She has been working with an organization that she co-founded with the name Kuskalla Abya Yala.  This presentation is about the activism from below that has emerged in Peru and by Peruvians abroad in the last decade of so. Quechua, as you may know, is the largest Native American Language by far (she has been teaching it in Davis since 2006) but decades ago it was declared as endangered because of the lack of inter-generational transmission. A young generation of Quechua-speaking scholars, artists and activists are driving the revitalization as a way to leave behind the structural violence and racism against their native language and to empower themselves through such language in order to confront the many transnational threats against their survival.

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

 

Aoki Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series | Professor Faheema Mustafaa & Tadria Cardena Rico

Tuesday, March 7, 2023 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

Dr. Faheemah N. Mustafaa joined the School of Education as an assistant professor in 2019. She is also a member of the Human Development Graduate Group, and faculty research affiliate with the Center for Poverty & Inequality Research. Prior to joining the School of Education faculty, she was a postdoctoral researcher in Social-Personality Psychology at University of California, Berkeley, and in Teaching and Learning at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Mustafaa earned her Ph.D. in the Combined Program in Education and Psychology, and M.A. in Higher Education, both from the University of Michigan.

Her interdisciplinary research primarily focuses on: (1) understanding and supporting the academic performance and holistic well-being of Black/African American and other youth with historically marginalized identities; and (2) studying the identity-related beliefs and pedagogies of K-12 and postsecondary educators.

Currently, Dr. Mustafaa is Co-Principal Investigator on a $2.4 million three-year National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study the experiences of Black girls and college women participating in a robotics and engineering program. She is also currently writing on Black K-12 educators’ racial identity attitudes and practice; the experiences of school-based community building among Black girls in the Bay Area; and equity praxis in postsecondary teaching and learning. 

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.

 

Aoki Center and HSI | Dr. Luis G. Carvajal-Carmona

Tuesday, March 14, 2023 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

 

Aoki Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series | Professor Kimberly D. Nettles-Barcelón

Tuesday, March 21, 2023 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

Kimberly D. Nettles-Barcelón is an Associate Professor in the Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies program at UC Davis. She has degrees in Broadcast Journalism/Study of Women & Men in Society (B.A., University of Southern California), Sociology (M.A. and Ph.D., UCLA), and a Professional Baking Certificate (Tanté Marie Cooking School, San Francisco). Her research and writing interests are in Black women's resistance throughout the African Diaspora. She has published an auto-ethnography of her travels to gather the life-history narratives of Guyanese women activists in her Guyana Diaries: Women's Lives Across Difference (Left Coast Press, 2008) and articles in Social Movement Studies and Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism. She is also a scholar of critical food studies with a particular focus on race and gendered representations of Black women and food in popular culture. Most recently, she has articles that think through the significance of Black women's work with food as a form of cultural and political resistance, with pieces that have appeared in the critically acclaimed journals Gastronomica: the Journal of Critical Food Studies and BOOM: A Journal of California. Nettles-Barcelón serves as a Book Review Editor for Food and Foodways.

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.
 

Aoki Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series | Dr. Richard S. Kim, Asian America Studies 

Tuesday, April 4, 2023 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

Richard S. Kim is a Professor in the Department of Asian American Studies. He received his Ph.D. in U.S. History from the Department of History at the University of Michigan.  He also obtained a M.A. in Asian American Studies from UCLA.  His research and teaching interests include 20th century U.S. history, Asian American history, transnationalism and diaspora, race and ethnicity, and social and political movements.

He is the author of The Quest for Statehood: Korean Immigrant Nationalism and U.S. Sovereignty, 1905-1945 (Oxford University Press, 2011). He is currently working on ex-Death Row inmate Chol Soo Lee’s memoir, Freedom Without Justice, that chronicles Lee’s conviction and incarceration for a crime he did not commit in the 1970s and an ensuing grass-roots pan-Asian political movement that helped secure his historic release from Death Row in 1983.  Following the completion of Chol Soo Lee’s memoir, he will begin a book project on the Free Chol Soo Lee social movement that emerged from Lee’s legal cases. In 2014-15, Richard Kim received a UC Davis Chancellor Fellows Award in recognition of his outstanding research, teaching, and service record.

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions. 

 

Aoki Center and DEI | A Guide to Civil Procedure | Integrating Critical Legal Perspectives

Tuesday, April 11, 2023 | 12 - 1 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301 & via Zoom

Dean Johnson and Professor Brian Soucek will discuss their contributions to the book. Professor Soucek will discuss his chapter on Judicial Impartiality (Based on so called Identity bias)

More information to follow. Please contact Nina Bell at nbell@ucdavis.edu with any questions.

 

Past Events

  • Explore previous events
  • Political Provocations in the Classroom

    Friday, May 1, 2019, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm, Putah Creek Lodge

    A half-day workshop on the legal framework and creative possibilities for responding to controversial expression in class.

     

    "Decolonizing Federal Indian Law," with Victorio Shaw | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, September 4, 2018, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Victorio Shaw '11 will discuss the modern and historical context of America's most enigmatic field of law.

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes: Civil Procedure

    Thursday, August 30, 2018, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, 1303

    Please join us for the first presentation in the Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes speaker series, "What the State Owes You Before Imposing Its Violence Upon You." Professor Brian Soucek will be providing an introduction to critical perspectives and their application to civil procedure. Lunch will be provided.

    You may download the flyer for the event here .

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes: Criminal Law

    Wednesday, August 29, 2018, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for the first presentation in the Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes speaker series. Professor Gabriel "Jack" Chin will be providing an introduction to critical perspectives and their application to criminal law. Lunch will be provided.

    You may download the flyer for the event here .

    Resources cited

    Gary E. Potter, History of Policing in the South

    Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name The Re-Enslavement of Black People in America from the Civil War to World War II (Pulitzer, 2009)

    David Musto, The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control (1999)

    International Association of Chiefs of Police Apology for Police Racism

    US DOJ Report on Policing in Ferguson, Missouri 

    Kevin R. Johnson, How Racial Profiling in America Became the Law of the Land: United States v. Brignoni- Ponce and Whren v. United States and the Need for Truly Rebellious Lawyering, 98 Geo. L.J. 1005 (2010)

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes: Contract Law

    Tuesday, August 28, 2018, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for the first presentation in the Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes speaker series. Professor Thomas Joo will be providing an introduction to critical perspectives and their application to contract law. Lunch will be provided.

    You may download the flyer for the event here .

     

    Fall Semester 2018 Kickoff Mixer

    Wednesday, August 22, 2018, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301

    Please join Center Director Mary Louise Frampton, new Aoki Center Fellow Ken Wang '18, and core faculty at the Aoki Center's Fall 2018 Kickoff Mixer. All students are welcome to join us and discuss the Center's mission, upcoming 1L programs and seminar series, and learn about the Aoki Student Collective.

    You may download a flyer for the event here .

     

    "How Racism Drives Immigration Policy and the Role of the Courts" | Immigration in Crisis Lecture Series

    Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1001

    The UC Davis School of Law is internationally recognized for its depth of expertise in Immigration Law. Today's news headlines, Congressional showdowns and fierce public debate all revolve around immigration policies regarding undocumented immigrants, open vs. closed borders, migrant labor, etc. Our lecture series will provide informed discussion rather than rhetoric. The United States is at a critical juncture in immigration reform – experts from King Hall will give insight into how policy actions impact human rights, labor, DREAMers and refugees.  

    April 24th's event will feature Dean Kevin Johnson, UC Davis School of Law, and Professor Gabriel "Jack" Chin, UC Davis School of Law. Lunch will be served.

     

    "California’s Experiment with Prison Downsizing: Any progress in Reversing Racial Disparities in Correctional Involvement?" with Professor Ryken Grattet | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join the Aoki Center for the next installment in the Spring 2018 Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series. Ryken Grattet, Chair of the UC Davis Department of Sociology, will be presenting on his work. Lunch will be provided.

     

    "Providing and Taking Away Sanctuary for Immigration and Refugees" | Immigration in Crisis Lecture Series

    Tuesday, April 3, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1001

    The UC Davis School of Law is internationally recognized for its depth of expertise in Immigration Law. Today's news headlines, Congressional showdowns and fierce public debate all revolve around immigration policies regarding undocumented immigrants, open vs. closed borders, migrant labor, etc. Our lecture series will provide informed discussion rather than rhetoric. The United States is at a critical juncture in immigration reform – experts from King Hall will give insight into how policy actions impact human rights, labor, DREAMers and refugees.  

    April 3rd's event will feature Associate Vice Chancellor Raquel Aldana, Professor Rose Villazor, Professor Brian Soucek, and Professor Shayak Sarkar. Lunch will be served.

     

    "21st Century Coolies" | Immigration in Crisis Lecture Series

    Thursday, March 15, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1001

    The UC Davis School of Law is internationally recognized for its depth of expertise in Immigration Law. Today's news headlines, Congressional showdowns and fierce public debate all revolve around immigration policies regarding undocumented immigrants, open vs. closed borders, migrant labor, etc. Our lecture series will provide informed discussion rather than rhetoric. The United States is at a critical juncture in immigration reform – experts from King Hall will give insight into how policy actions impact human rights, labor, DREAMers and refugees.  

    Lunch will be served.

     

    8th Annual Equity Summit

    Tuesday, March 13, 2018, 4:30 PM - 9:00 PM | UC Davis Conference Center

    The UC Davis Equity Summit coalesces people, ideas and institutions to deepen strategies, shape our actions and formulate solutions. This annual event addresses the pertinent social issues of our time. Educators, community members and experts with perspectives from a range of disciplines come together to help guide our understanding and push us forward. For more information, please visit the event's webpage.

     

    Lunchtime Seminar with Professor Bruce Haynes | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, March 13, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join the Aoki Center for the next installment in the Spring 2018 Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series. Bruce Haynes, Professor in the UC Davis Department of Sociology, will be presenting on his work. Lunch will be provided.

     

    Lunchtime Seminar with Professor Courtney Joslin | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join the Aoki Center for the next installment in the Spring 2018 Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series. Courtney Joslin, Professor of Law at King Hall, will be presenting on her work. Lunch will be provided.

     

    "Challenging the American Dream: The Future of DACA" | Immigration in Crisis Lecture Series

    Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1001

    The UC Davis School of Law is internationally recognized for its depth of expertise in Immigration Law. Today's news headlines, Congressional showdowns and fierce public debate all revolve around immigration policies regarding undocumented immigrants, open vs. closed borders, migrant labor, etc. Our lecture series will provide informed discussion rather than rhetoric. The United States is at a critical juncture in immigration reform – experts from King Hall will give insight into how policy actions impact human rights, labor, DREAMers and refugees.  

    February 28th's event will feature Dean Kevin Johnson, UC Davis School of Law, and Professor Amagda Pérez, Co-Director of the UC Davis School of Law Immigration Law Clinic. Lunch will be served.

     

    "Dispossession by Administration: The Open Secret of Racial Capitalist Violence" | Mellon Initiative in Racial Capitalism

    Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 4:00 PM | Voorhies Hall, Rm 126

    This initiative brings UC Davis faculty and graduate students together with outside scholars and activists to advance a research agenda that focuses on racial capitalism. The historical relationship between race and capitalism is one of the most enduring and controversial debates in U.S. historiography. Sometimes explicitly, often only implicitly acknowledged, it shapes fundamental questions about inequality, value, life, bondage, and freedom, among others, across the disciplines of race and ethnic studies, history, literary studies, law, economics, sociology and anthropology. Over the course of the next three years we will be staging dialogues across current work and chart new directions for the study of racial capitalism. For more information, please visit the Initiative's webpage

     

    "An Immodest Proposal: Children, Citizenship, and Vicarious Voting as a Solution to California-Style Feudalism," with Professor Christopher Elmendorf | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, February 27, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Professor Elmendorf will discuss the emergence of a quasi-feudal social hierarchy in California, in which an aging, home-owning, and electorally dominant class has secured for itself artificially inflated home values and low, hereditable tax bases, to the grave detriment of newcomers, poor people, and most children. He will suggest several electoral remedies, including automatic voter registration of parents upon their child’s birth, pre-registration of children at birth, and a parental right to vote vicariously on behalf of children under the age of 18. Lunch will be provided.

     

    "Racial Capitalism and History" | Mellon Initiative in Racial Capitalism

    Wednesday, February 14, 2018, 4:00 PM | Voorhies Hall, Rm 126

    This initiative brings UC Davis faculty and graduate students together with outside scholars and activists to advance a research agenda that focuses on racial capitalism. The historical relationship between race and capitalism is one of the most enduring and controversial debates in U.S. historiography. Sometimes explicitly, often only implicitly acknowledged, it shapes fundamental questions about inequality, value, life, bondage, and freedom, among others, across the disciplines of race and ethnic studies, history, literary studies, law, economics, sociology and anthropology. Over the course of the next three years we will be staging dialogues across current work and chart new directions for the study of racial capitalism. For more information, visit the Initiative's webpage

     

    "Oyama v. California: A Play" with Professor Rose Villazor | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, February 20, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall 1301

    Oyama v. California, 332 U.S. 633 (1948), is a case that challenged the constitutionality of California's Alien Land Law. The law prohibited Japanese and other individuals who were not racially eligible to become citizens from owning land. Professors and students will re-enact parts of the trial and dramatizes the Supreme Court opinion. Lunch will be provided. The day's event is sponsored by the Aoki Center for Critical Race and Nation Studies, the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA), and the Filipino Law Students Association (FLSA).

     

    SAYS Grand Slam Finals

    Saturday, February 17, 2018, 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM | Crocker Art Museum

    Sacramento Area Youth Speaks (SAYS) is an innovative critical literacy program. SAYS services support the improvement of schools through teacher professional development, classroom instruction, and after-school programming. At the core of our model is a commitment to equity—SAYS utilizes evidence-based best practices to narrow the achievement gap. Please join SAYS for the finals of its annual slam poetry competition. For more information visit says.ucdavis.edu!

     

    "Border Protests and Transnational Solidarities" | Mellon Initiative in Comparative Border Studies

    Wednesday, February 14, 2018, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM | Manetti Shrem Museum of Art

    As a response to border tensions and conflicts, protest cultures have produced new, transborder communities and imaginaries that have reformulated transnational solidarities. Migrant rights, anti-war, feminist, queer, and indigenous rights movements have used cross-border networks as well as cultural production and digital technologies to mobilize across borders, but have also faced repression, criminalization, and nativist backlash. This roundtable will bring together activists and scholars from around the world to explore how borders are evoking new dynamics of resistance in different sites of struggle against racialized border violence, militarization, occupation, displacement, partition, and colonization. For information, please visit the Initiative's event page

     

    "Ferguson, Gaza, Standing Rock: Histories of Settler Colonialism and Anti-Blackness," with Professor Justin Leroy | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join the Aoki Center for the next installment in the Spring 2018 Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series. Prof. Justin Leroy, assistant professor in the UC Davis Department of History, will be presenting on his work. Lunch will be provided.

     

    "My President was Black...So What?: Sociopolitical Realities of Black Youth Males," with Dr. Lawrence Winn | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, February 6, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join the Aoki Center for its second installment in the Spring 2018 Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series. Dr. Torry Winn, co-director of the Transformative Justice in Education Center (TJE) at the UC Davis School of Education, will be presenting on his work. Lunch will be provided.

     

    Janet Mock | Campus Community Book Project

    Monday, February 5, 2018, 8:00 PM | Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

    Janet Mock is a transgender rights activist, TV host and New York Times bestselling author of "Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More." Please join the Campus Community Book Project for a discussion with Janet Mock, whose book was selected as the campus book for the 2017-2018 year. For more information, please visit the event's Facebook page

     

    "The Advocacy of the King Hall Immigration Law Clinic in the Age of Trump," with Holly Cooper | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, January 30, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Please join the Aoki Center for its second installment in the Spring 2018 Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series. Holly Cooper, co-director of the Immigration Law Clinic here at King Hall, will be presenting on her work. Lunch will be provided.

     

    SOC 1st Year & Transfer Mixer | UC Davis Cross Cultural Center

    Monday, January 29, 2018, 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM | Student Community Center

    Please join the UC Davis Cross Culture Center in a mixer for first year and transfer students of color. This quarter's mixer offers students the ability to build a cross-community while sharing in the many ways students may become involved on the UC Davis campus. For more information, visit the event's Facebook page

     

    "Confederate Monuments, Civil Rights Memorials and Civic Values" | UCD College of Letters and Science

    Thursday, January 25, 2018, 7:00 PM | Manetti Shrem Museum of Art

    The UC Davis Human Rights Program lecture series presents “Confederate Monuments, Civil Rights Memorials and Civic Values” with Dell Upton, art history chair at UCLA, and Ari Kelman, associate dean and history professor at UC Davis. It takes place at 7 p.m. on Jan. 25 at the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art at UC Davis. “My talk will address the complex ways that conflicting values — of inclusive citizenship (the Civil Rights Movement) and of the celebration of a white supremacist movement (the Confederacy and its aftermath) — play out in public spaces, particularly, but not only in the South,” said Upton, a preeminent thinker on the role of race, monuments and memorials. “In the debates over these monuments, competing claims about history and heritage as well as confusion over the status of monuments as commemorations of the past or as historic artifacts themselves, serve to illuminate the strains in the contemporary American body politic.” Upton is author of the 2015 book What Can and Can’t Be Said, a study of civil rights and African American history monuments in the South.

     

    "The Other Slavery," with Professor Andrés Reséndez | Interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join the Aoki Center in hosting Andrés Reséndez, Professor in the UC Davis Department of History and author of The Other Slavery. Professor Reséndez will discuss the contents of his book, which recounts the history of Native American slavery in North America and the Caribbean. Lunch will be served. 

     

    "Memorials and Monuments: Lessons from Charlottesville, New Orleans and Port Chicago" | UCD College of Letters and Science

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM | Sierra 2 Center's 24th St. Theatre

    The role of monuments to the Confederacy, and the recent movement to remove them, will be the core subject of two UC Davis events in January. “Memorials and Monuments: Lessons from Charlottesville, New Orleans and Port Chicago,” featuring several UC Davis faculty members, will be held Jan. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at Sierra 2 Center’s 24th Street Theatre, 2791 24th St., Sacramento. Part of a new series by the UC Davis Humanities Institute, the event will reflect on recent incidents in Charlottesville and New Orleans, among other places, and how nations memorialize the past. Visit the event's webpage for more information.

     

    Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration

    Tuesday, January 16, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 2304

    Please join the Aoki Center and the Black Law Students Association (BLSA) in celebrating the legacy of Dr. King at the UC Davis School of Law. Afterward, join BLSA for a presentation on seeking employment in big law with a representative from Fenwick & West. Panda Express will be served. 

     

    Dread Scott: Imagine A World Without America

    Thursday, November 30, 2017, 7:00 P.M. - 8:00 P.M. | Manetti Shrem Museum of Art

    Please join the Aoki Center in attending the Manetti Shrem Museum of Art's special event, "Dread Scott: Imagine A World Without America."  The night will feature a discussion by Dread Scott, an artist and activist, whose work is featuerd in the Museum's current exhibit Dimensions of Black.

    Organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego in collaboration with the San Diego African American Museum of Fine Art, Dimensions of Black traces the legacy of UC San Diego's MFA program by drawing from the museums' permanent collections. With over 30 artworks from the 1960s to today, the exhibition traverses crucial interests and perspectives that have shaped the art of our time.

    To find out more information, please access the flyer for the event here .

     

    Humanizando la Deportación/Humanizing Deportation: A Digital Storytelling Project | Mellon Initiative in Comparative Border Studies

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017, 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM | Manetti Shrem Museum of Art

    This digital storytelling project aims to make visible the range of humanitarian issues that proliferate in our current regime of mass human displacement. This UC-MEXUS funded collaboration between UC Davis and El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (with additional participation of colleagues from other institutions, including UC Berkeley) has assisted community members in producing a bilingual open access archive of personal stories about deportation (http://humanizandoladeportacion.ucdavis.edu/en/). The project team will present this archive, discussing the methodological, ethical and political issues that they have encountered in its creation.

    You can find out more information on the Comparative Border Studies' website.

     

    A Right to Stay Home for Central American Migrants

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Vice Chancellor Raquel Aldana. Vice Chancellor Aldana currently serves as the Associate Vice Chancellor of Academic Diversity  here at UC Davis and as Professor of Law at King Hall . She received her B.A. in English and Spanish from Arizona State University in 1993 and her J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1997. Prior to joining King Hall, Vice Chancellor Aldana served as Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship at the McGeorge School of Law, where she founded and direct the Inter-American Program.

     

    Racial Capitalism and Literary Studies with Adrienne Brown and Mark Jerng | Mellon Initiative in Racial Capitalism

    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 4:00 PM | 228 Voorhies Hall

    For more information, check out the Mellon Initiative in Racial Capitalism's Facebook page.

     

    Racial Reconciliation, Institutional Morality, and the Social Life of DNA | Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies

    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM | MPR Student Community Center

    Dr. Alondra Nelson, Distinguished Professor at Colombia University, will give the keynote presentation. Her talk, "Racial Reconciliation, Institutional Morality, and the Social Life of DNA" will examine the recent use of genetic ancestry testing by the descendants of nearly three hundred enslaved men and women owned by Georgetown University, whom the institution’s Jesuit stewards sold to Southern plantations in 1838 in order to secure its solvency. The case of the GU 272 will be explored as a “reconciliation project”—a social endeavor in which DNA analysis is put to the use of repairing historic injury.

    If interested, make sure to RSVP. You can find out more event by downloading the event's - poster .

     

    Environmental Law and the Racial State

    Tuesday, October 31, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Keith Miyake. Keith currently serves as a Chancellor's Postdoctral Fellow in the Department of American Studies at UC Davis. Keith received a B.A. in Engineering from Harvey Mudd College in 2004 and his Ph.D. in Earth and Environmental Sciences from the Graduate Center at City University of New York in 2016. After his fellowship, Keith will be moving to Southern California to serve as an Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Riverside in the Fall of 2018.

     

    Assembly and Riot: Michael Hardt and Joshua Clover in conversation | Mellon Initiative in Racial Capitalism

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 4:00 PM | Manetti Shrem Museum of Art

    For more information, check out the Mellon Initiatve in Racial Capitalism's Facebook page.

     

    The Problems with Thrice Stolen Wealth: Private Philanthropy in the Trump Era

    Tuesday, October 24, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Professor Erica Kohl-Arenas. Professor Kohl-Arenas is the Faculty Director of Imagining America and an associate professor in the department of American Studies at UC Davis. Professor Kohl-Arenas received a B.A. in Sociology from Reed College in 1991, a M.S. in Community Development from UC Davis in 1999, and her Ph.D. in Social and Cultural Studies from UC Berkeley in 2010. She is the author of The Self-Help Myth: How Philanthropy Fails to Alleviate Poverty, for which she was named "philanthropy critic of the year" by Inside Philanthropy in 2016.

     

    Racial Healing Circles

    Beginning Thursday, October 19, 2017, 6:00 P.M. - 9:00 P.M. | UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA

    Please join the UC Davis Clinical and Transitional Science Center for Racial Healing Circles and share your stories about race, culture, color, language and class to promote healing!

    Background Info on the Racial Healing Project

    The RECAB Racial Healing Project seeks to create a safe space to foster dialogue on healing and resiliency among academic and community partners to proactively strengthen our collective ability to acknowledge racism and discrimination that is affecting many community members of our academic institution and the public at-large. The Racial Healing Project aims to uplift the best practices from the field (Racial Healing Initiative led by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Attitudinal Healing Connection). The project will focus on convening academic-community oriented healing circles on sensitive topics about race, culture, color and class.

    We will be adopting the Attitudinal Healing Connection's model of defining racism as a life threatening disease. We express that the concept of race is a social and cultural construct. The focus will be on storytelling and narrative change.

    This program is funded by the Diversity and Inclusion (DI) Innovation Grant. Funding for this program was the result of a collaborative partnership between the Office of Student Affairs and Campus Diversity, the Campus Council on Community and Diversity, and the Office of Campus Community Relations, and the Staff Diversity Administrative Advisory Committee.

    All members of the campus community and public are welcomed and encouraged to attend and participate in the racial healing circles.

    Make sure to RSVP for all sessions no later than Monday, October 16, 2017

    For more information, download the - event flyer .

     

    The Color of Water

    Thursday, October 19, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Camille Pannu. Camille currently serves as the director of the Water Justice Clinic here at UC Davis. She received her B.A. in Political Economy from UC Berkeley in 2006 and her J.D. from the UC Berkeley School of Law in 2011. Prior to joining King Hall, Camille served as an Equal Justice Works Fellow in the southern San Joaquin Valley, where she worked with low-income residents to combat poverty and environmental racism.

     

    "Data Farming: Seeding a 'Data Revolution' in African Agriculture" with Zenia Kish | Mellon Initiative in Racial Capitalism

    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 4:00 PM | 126 Voorhies Hall

    For more information, check out the Mellon Initiative in Racial Capitalism's Facebook page.

     

    The Politics of Mass Prosecution

    Tuesday, October 17, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Professor Irene Joe. Professor Joe received her B.A. in Government and African American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2003 and her J.D. from Stanford University in 2006. Professor Joe was the Binder Teaching Fellow at UCLA School of Law where she taught courses in the Ethics of Criminal Justice, Voir Dire, and Trial Advocacy. Her scholarly interests involve examining the structural integrity of distribution decisions in under-resourced criminal justice institutions.

     

    Celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day: William Fletcher

    Monday, October 9, 2017, 3:30 - 5:00 P.M. | King Hall, Rm 1301

    Please join the Aoki Center in welcoming Judge William A. Fletcher. Judge Fletcher will be providing a discussion on Native Americans and the law. Doors will open on 3:30 P.M. and the event will begin shortly after at 3:45 P.M.

     

    Celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day: Panel

    Monday, October 9, 2017, Noon - 1:00 P.M. | King Hall, Rm 1301

    You are invited to participate in the Aoki Center's Indigenous Peoples Day celebration! The celebration will begin with a noon hour panel discussing the impact Columbus and Western European culture had on the Americas. More details to come!

     

    The Struggle for California Lands

    Tuesday, October 3, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Professor Beth Rose Middleton. Professor Middleton is an associate professor in the department of Native American Studies at UC Davis. Professor Middleton received a B.A. in Nature and Culture from UC Davis in 2001 and her Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management from UC Berkeley in 2008. She is the author of Trust in the Land: New Directions in Tribal Conservation, and is currently researching Indian land rights and hydroelectric development in northeastern California.

     

    Access to Legal Services as a Racial Justice Issue

    Tuesday, September 26, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Cruz Reynoso, a former California Supreme Court Justice and professor emeritus here at King Hall. In addition to Professor Reynoso's presentation, clips from 'Sowing the Seeds of Justice,' a documentary regarding Professor Reynoso's life, will be shown.

     

    And Then They Came For Us

    Saturday, September 23, 2017, 2:00 P.M. | Crest Theatre, 1013 K Street, Sacramento

    Please join the Aoki Center for the Asian Bar Association of Sacramento (ABAS) Law Foundation's viewing of And They Came For Us, a film by Abby Ginzberg and Ken Schneider. Featuring George Takei, And They Came For Us documents the lawless incarceration of innocent Japanese Americans and warns of the precedent it has set for official forms of discrimination today. After the film, join moderator Sharon Ito for a post-film discussion panel featuring Cruz Reynoso, Mia Yamamoto, Basim Elkarra, and Abby Ginzberg. Admission is $15, $10 for seniors and students.

     

    Looking Ahead to the 2018 Midterm Elections: How Changing Demography Will - or Won't - Influence Outcomes

    Tuesday, September 19, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Mindy Romero. Professor Romero is the founder and director of the California Civic Engagement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change. She received her B.A. from UC Davis in Political Science and Sociology, and received both her M.A. and Ph.D. from UC Davis in Sociology.

    Professor Romero's PowerPoint presentation on the changing demography can be accessed here .

     

    Transforming Schools: Toward Racial Equity in Education

    Tuesday, September 12, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1303

    Please join us for a presentation by Dr. Vajra Watson. Dr. Watson serves as the director of Research and Policy for Equity at the UC Davis School of Education and  is the founder of Sacramento Area Youth Speaks. Before joining UC Davis, Dr. Watson received her B.A. from UC Berkeley, and two Master’s degrees and her Doctorate from the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University.

     

    Student Advisory Board Meeting

    Monday, September 11, 2017, 5:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M. | King Hall, Rm 2320

    Students are invited to the Aoki Center's first Student Advisory Board meeting. All students are welcome to come and learn how they can become more involved with the Center this year.

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes: Criminal Law & Torts

    Thursday, August 31, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, 1301

    Please join us for the final presentation in the OneL Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes speaker series. Professors Jack Chin and Lisa Pruitt will discuss, respectively, critical perspectives and their application to criminal law and torts. Lunch will be provided.

    You may download the flyer for the event - here .

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes: Civil Procedure and Property Law

    Please join us for the second presentation in the OneL Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes speaker series. Professor Brian Souchek will be discussing critical perspectives and their application to civil procedure and property law. Lunch will be provided.

    You may download the flyer for the event - here .

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes: Introduct to Cirtical Perspectives and Application to Constitutional Law

    Monday, August 28, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301

    Please join us for the first presentation in the OneL Critical Perspectives on First Year Classes speaker series. Professor Angela Harris will be providing an introduction to critical perspectives and their application to Constitutional Law. Lunch will be provided.

    You may download the flyer for the event here.

     

    Fall Semester 2017 Kickoff Mixer

    Wednesday, August 23, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1301

    Please join Center Director Mary Louise Frampton, new Aoki Center Fellow John Miller '17, and core faculty at the Aoki Center's Fall 2017 Kickoff Mixer. All students are welcome to join us and discuss the Center's mission, upcoming 1L programs and seminar series, and learn about the creation of a student advisory board.

    You may download a flyer for the event here .

     

    Charlottesville: Protest, Counter-Protest, Intolerance, Fear, and Violence

    Tuesday, August 22, 2017, Noon - 1:00 PM | King Hall, Rm 1001

    Please join us for a discussion and open forum about the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia. This town hall is designed to help our community process these recent events. This event is being sponsored by the UC Davis School of Law, the Aoki Center for Critical Race and Nation Studies, the King Hall Law Student Association, and the American Constitution Society of King Hall.

    You may download a flyer for the event here.

     

    Vanguard Court Watch Honors UCD Prison Law Clinic with Panel discussion featuring Professor Gabriel "Jack" Chin

    Saturday, November 15th Davis Senior Center 626 A St. Davis 5pm

    Please join the Aoki Center in Congratulating the Prison Law Clinic as a recipient of this award.

     

    Pioneering Chinese Law Students in American Law Schools

    September 25th, King Hall Room 1002 12pm to 1pm

    Chen Li is Lee Foundation Fellow at Washington University in St. Louis and Global Associate at National University of Singapore. His current main research interest is in Chinese legal history with a concentration upon early Chinese students' legal education in the U.S., U.K., France, Germany, Belgium and Switzerland. He is currently working on a project to chronicle the story of these early law students' experiences and academic performance in various law schools and programs, and their subsequent impact on reshaping the Chinese Diplomatic Service and creating modern legal education in China in the late 19th and early 20th century.In this talk, Chen Li will discuss early Chinese students' varied experiences in American law schools, and the Chinese Exclusion Act's pernicious effect on denying early Chinese law graduates to gain admission to the bar in the U.S.

     

    Fellowship for Research on Race, Gender, Culture and Crime 2014

    Consider - applying  for the W.E.B. DuBois Fellowship for Research on Race, Gender, Culture and Crime 2014. Applications are due by May 12, 2014. The Fellowship program seeks to advance knowledge regarding the confluence of crime, justice, and culture in various societal contexts. The Fellowship places particular emphasis on crime, violence, and the administration of criminal justice in diverse cultural contexts within the United States. 
     
    Find the application materials and more details here .

     

    Critical Perspectives in Constitutional Law with Professor Harris

    April 10th, King Hall Room 2304

    Please join Professor Harris in a discussion about critical perspectives in Constitutional Law. All students are welcome. Food will be served.

     

    Critical Perspectives in Civil Procedure with Dean Johnson

    March 19th, King Hall Room 2304

    Please join Dean Johnson in a discussion about critical perspectives in Civil Procedure. All students are welcome. Food will be served.

     

    Critical Perspectives in Contract Law with Professor Joo

    March 3rd. King Hall Room 2304

    Please join Professor Joo in a discussion about critical perspectives in Contracts. All students are welcome. Food will be served.

     

    Science, Sexuality and (In)Security

    February 28th, 9-4pm, UC Davis Art Annex

    Join us for a Social Justice Mellon Project Event. This roundtable event will focus on emergent ethical concerns around race/ethnicity, reproductive technologies, and the production of national ontological insecurities. The dialogue will center on how "new" racism and sexism, and "old" homophobia manifest in the 21st century to regulate and contain sexual and reproductive freedom and mobility.

    - download the flyer 

     

    Critical Perspectives on Tort Law with Professor Pruitt

    February 11th, King Hall Room 2304

    Please join Professor Pruitt in a discussion about critical perspectives in Tort Law. All students are welcome. Food will be served.

     

    Critical Perspectives on Criminal Law with Professor Chin

    January 29th, King Hall Room 2304

    Please join Professor Chin in a discussion about critical perspectives in Criminal Law. All students are welcome. Food will be served.

     

    Aoki Center Spring Speaker Series

    January 14th, King Hall Room 2304

    Join King Hall faculty to discuss critical perspectives on first year classes. On January 14, Professor Villazor will be discussing critical perspectives in Property Law. All are welcome, food will be served on all days.

    - download the flyer 

     

    Django Unchained, Lincoln and 12 Years A Slave

    November 14, from 4-6 PM in 126 Voorhies

    On November 14, from 4-6 PM in 126 Voorhies, Professor Matthew Vernon and Meg Sparling will host a roundtable discussion about three recent films on African American slavery:Django Unchained, Lincoln, and Twelve Years a Slave. The release of these films poses many important questions, including: slavery's relationship to contemporary politics, the racial and gender politics of slavery's representation in these films (and others), and cinema's ability (or inability) to interrogate the complex relationship between spectatorship and witnessing. Everyone is welcome! We'll have wine and cookies. Hope to see you there.

     

    15 Percent & Growing

    Thursday, November 14th, 2013 Noon-1:00PM Room 1001 King Hall

    Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are a sizable and rapidly growing portion of California. AAPIs today represent over 1 in every 7 residents in California and about 10% of the electorate. Come join us for a public forum on the policy priorities and civic engagement of AAPIs in California, featuring insights from policy scholars and community leaders on the ways to forge a new path forward.

     

    Aoki Center Official Fall Launch Celebration

    King Hall Courtyard, 6-8 p.m. Monday, October 7, 2013.

    All students are welcome to join King Hall faculty and affiliates for the official fall launch and celebration of the Aoki Center. The Aoki Center sponsors programs at King Hall and across the UC Davis campus that highlight critical scholarship, connecting faculty who conduct critical scholarship on issues involving race, immigration, and/or nation with one another and with interested students. FOOD and DRINKS will be provided!

     

    Jose Antonio Vargas on the Undocumented Experience

    5:00 PM, King Hall Room 1001

    You are invited to attend a special presentation by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas at UC Davis School of Law. Vargas is the founder of Define American, a campaign that seeks to elevate the conversation around immigration.

    In 2011, in a groundbreaking and controversial - essay published in The New York Times, Vargas revealed himself to be an undocumented immigrant. He also appeared on the cover of TIME magazine. Vargas has testified at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on immigration reform, and written and directed Documented, a documentary film on his undocumented experience. He will preview clips from the film at this event. 

    This event is sponsored by the Filipino Law Students Association (FLSA), the Aoki Center for Critical Race & Nation Studies, the Immigration Law Association, the Filipino Bar Association of Northern California (FBANC), and UC Davis School of Law.

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year classes: Contracts Law with Professor Joo

    King Hall - Room 2304

    Professor Joo will speak about critical perspectives in Contracts Law. He will discuss the development of "substantive due process," a constitutional doctrine that protected freedom of contract and other economic rights, and its relationship to civil rights cases involving Chinese immigrants in 19th century America. His talk will be based on articles he has published on the topic: Yick Wo Re-Revisited: Nonblack Nonwhites and Fourteenth Amendment History, 2008 U. Ill. L. Rev 1427; and A New "Conspiracy Theory" of the Fourteenth Amendment, 29 U.S.F. L. Rev. 353 (1995). 

    April 3rd at noon. Lunch will be served. This is part of the 2013 Aoki Center Spring Speaker Series

     

    A New Vision for Racial Justice in the School of Law

    Join us for an introductory talk on a leading edge model being used in law schools to cultivate racially just scholarship and practice. Speakers include: Dean Spade, J.D., joining via Skype from Columbia University and Jolie Harris, M. Ed. and Erica Dobney, M.A. of Thrive Social Justice Consulting. 

    Sponsored by: The Aoki Center for Critical Race and Nation Studies, The Coalition for Diversity, and National Lawyers Guild. 

    See the - event flyer.

    Thursday, March 14, 2013. 12-1pm. King Hall Room 2306. Lunch will be provided. 

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year classes: Criminal Law with Professor Chin

    King Hall - Room 2304

    Professor Chin will be speaking on critical perspectives in Criminal Law. He will talk about some of the ways in which the contemporary criminal justice system perpetuates or tolerates racism. These include: the criminal justice system's acceptance of discriminatory policing, prosecution and sentencing, racism in substantive criminalization, and the effects of cognitive bias. Lunch will be served.

    This is part of the 2013 Aoki Center Spring Speaker Series.

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year classes: Torts with Professor Pruitt

    King Hall - Room 2304

    Professor Pruitt will be speak about critical perspectives in Tort Law. Lunch will be served.

    This is part of the 2013 Aoki Center Spring Speaker Series.

     

    Angela Harris presents her new book: Race and Equality Law

    King Hall - Room 2303

    Please join Professor Angela Harris for a preview of her new book, a volume of essays that show how critical race theory, an analytic approach developed in the United States, can shed light on the workings of race in political-legal systems as diverse as South Africa, New Zealand, France, and Latin and South America.

    The essays reveal how, in country after country, equality law preserves racial inequality even while denouncing it.

    See the - event flyer.

    Lunch will be served. Co-sponsored by the Coalition for Diversity and Aoki Center for Critical Race and Nation Studies.

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year classes: Civil Procedure with Dean Johnson

    King Hall - Room 2304

    Dean Johnson will discuss "Integrating Racial Justice into the Civil Procedure Survey Course." The discussion, which will touch on gender and class as well as race, will be based on a published paper in 54 Journal of Legal Education 242 (2004). Lunch will be served.

    This is part of the 2013 Aoki Center Spring Speaker Series.

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year classes: Constitutional Law with Dean Amar

    February 5, 2013 - 12:00PM - King Hall Room 2302

    Dean Amar talk will focus on critical perspectives about race, sex and the electoral college concerning Constitutional Law. Lunch will be served.

    This is part of the 2013 Aoki Center Spring Speaker Series.

     

    Critical Perspectives on First Year classes: Property Law with Professor Villazor

    King Hall - Room 2304

    Professor Villazor will give a presentation on "Critical Race Perspectives on Property Law." Lunch will be served. This is part of the 2013 Aoki Center Spring Speaker Series

     

    Sikhs and Sikh Studies in the United States

    Buehler Alumni Center

    Although Sikhs have been present in the United States since the turn of the twentieth century, the recent tragic shooting at a Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, has brought them into the national spotlight. The lecture and discussion will examine these events in light of Sikh history in the United States and South Asia.

    Discussion Panel Consisting of

    Gabriel “Jack” Chin (Professor of Law)

    Rajbir Judge (Graduate student of History)

    Richard Kim (Associate Professor of Asian American Studies)

    Co-sponsored by: Asian American Studies, History, Jewish studies, UC Davis Humanities and the UC Davis School of Law. For more Information please contact Gurjit Mann at ME/SA office at mesastaff@ucdavis.edu or call (530) 754-4926.

     

    Serigrafia

    Cruess Hall

    A talented panel of printmaking experts have teamed up to collaboratively curate this exhibition that surveys the powerful tradition of information design in California’s Latino culture.

    Start date: 10/8/12

    End date: 12/7/12

    Sponsored by: Design Museum, Exhibit Envoy, Department of Chicana/o Studies

    Contact phone: 530-752-6150