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Health Care Law and Bioethics

Advances in medical care and the life sciences are changing our lives, our society, and our world, and attorneys who specialize in health care law are increasingly in demand. The Health Care Law and Bioethics concentration at UC Davis School of Law provides the opportunity to study three core areas — health care law, bioethics, and public health law.

The Health Care Law and Bioethics concentration covers the traditional areas of study including medical liability, health law, bioethics, public health, reproductive health, biotechnology, and disability rights. Students are prepared for a diverse range of careers in areas such as medical liability, health law, bioethics, public health, reproductive health, biotechnology, and disability rights.

UC Davis School of Law specializes in creating practical legal experiences for all students. Many students interested in health care law and bioethics participate in judicial externships and gain the writing, research, and negotiation skills essential to practicing in this field. In addition, moot court competitions provide unique opportunities to develop trial and advocacy skills. Students also enhance their educations by participating in organizations or working on journals—the Law School sponsors approximately 40 student organizations and five scholarly journals.

Health care law and bioethics are inherently interdisciplinary. Accordingly, the Health Care Law and Bioethics courses are cross-listed for UC Davis medical school students and those pursuing a master's degree in public health. The study of Health Care Law and Bioethics at UC Davis School of Law thus includes the chance to engage with other students from across the campus and to learn from their perspectives. UC Davis speaker programs and the University's proximity to the state capitol create additional opportunities to hear distinguished experts on health care law and bioethics.

UC Davis law alumni who practice health care law work in a wide variety of settings, including local, state, and federal regulatory agencies, private health care facilities, insurance companies, and law firms. They represent clients concerning medical care issues, and encounter medical/legal ethical decisions and issues facing the regulation of the health care industry.