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Journals

UC Davis School of Law has six student run journals. Academic credit is offered to students for participating in select roles in four of the Law School's student journals: Environs, Immigration & Nationality Law Review, Journal of International Law & Policy, and the UC Davis Law Review. Information about all six journals is listed below.

UC Davis Law Review

The UC Davis Law Review is King Hall’s premier scholarly publication. Law Review publishes articles from legal academics, practitioners, and its own student editors. Each academic year, the student-run journal prints one volume composed of five issues and continually updates its more nimble online companion, the UC Davis Law Review Online. The annual UC Davis Law Review Symposium, focused on pressing legal issues, is one of the Law School’s showcase events. Law Review provides students the opportunity to hone their research and writing skills, while advancing the public discourse surrounding important legal topics.

All Law Review Editors and Members receive course credit. Please visit the Registrar’s Course Descriptions and contact Law Review for details. A student’s acceptance onto law review is determined by a write-on competition and, to a much smaller extent, first-year grades. Members (2Ls) must complete an approved note or comment and must perform production duties requiring a substantial time commitment. Editors (3Ls) have extensive duties specific to their particular positions. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

 

Business Law Journal

The UC Davis Business Law Journal (BLJ) is run by dedicated law students who are committed to providing current and valuable legal and business analysis. Participating students increase their opportunities to foster relationships with some of the most notable individuals in business law.

BLJ was the first business law journal in the nation to electronically publish articles written by professionals, academics, and law students using a concise, journalistic style. The journal is now published in both electronic and hard-copy format. While traditional law journals are heavy on academic theory and light on practical information, BLJ aims to provide a balanced synthesis of both. BLJ addresses a broad spectrum of issues that fall within the intersection of business and the law, including tax matters, intellectual property concerns, bankruptcy planning, employee benefits, information on the impact of recent legal rulings, and more.

BLJ also features interviews conducted by journal members with attorneys, professionals, judges, and academics. The interviews are aimed at providing timely and relevant discussions with and forecasts from those professionals who are shaping today's business and legal fields. Consequently, BLJ is a useful resource for both practitioners and academics in the often-interrelated worlds of business and law.

The students of BLJ are committed to bridging the gap between law school and practice, cultivating and sharing knowledge of developments in legal and business news, and promoting a new generation of ethical and professional business leaders.

Environs

Environs is a biannual environmental law and policy journal which supports an open forum for the discussion of current environmental issues. Articles explore environmental issues, particularly those pertaining to the state of California. The editor-in-chief of Environs receives two units credit for each semester of service. Managing editors receive 1 unit of credit. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Journal of International Law & Policy

The Journal of International Law & Policy is a biannual journal produced by King Hall students with an interest in international law. The journal's goal is to provide interesting and well-written articles by both students and professionals. The editor-in-chief of the Journal receives two credits for each semester of service. Managing editors receive 1 unit of credit. Grading is on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

Journal of Juvenile Law & Policy

The Journal of Juvenile Law and Policy is a biannual publication of the UC Davis School of Law addressing the unique concerns of children, their advocates, and the American legal system. Initially a product of the creativity and activism of a small group of King Hall students, the Journal has evolved into a vigorous scholarly publication committed to providing practical information regarding current juvenile, family, and educational law issues. A unique publication, the Journal is bifurcated to publish both academic works as well as practitioner and juvenile submissions in each volume The ultimate goal of the Journal is to encourage awareness and involvement by the legal community in the various issues facing juveniles today.

Immigration & Nationality Law Review

The Immigration & Nationality Law Review anthologizes a yearly collection of exceptional immigration scholarship published in other law journals around the country. It is one of the two major student-edited American law journals focused on immigration and nationality issues. Student editors identify articles suitable for reprinting, organize an annual symposium, and supervise Associate Members writing student notes. Associate Members' notes can satisfy the writing requirement. The Editor-in-Chief receives two credits for each semester of service. Executive editors receive one unit of credit. Grading is on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.