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Both second and third year students may enroll in externships, and may enroll in more than one externship program under specific guidelines (see below).

A. General Guidelines for Enrollment in Externships:

You may take up to 16 units during your second and third years in Clinicals (Law 420, Law 435, Law 440, Law 480, and Law 485) and the following courses:
Law 498 (Group Study);
Law 499 (Independent Research);
Law 408 (Community Education Seminar);
Law 410A & B, 414 (Moot Court);
Law 412, 413, 415 (Competitions, Trial Practice Board);
Law 416, 417, 418 (Law Review, Envir. Ed);
Law 419 (Adv. Writing Req.); and
Law 495 (Leg. Research or Writing T.A.), and in approved non-law courses.

An additional 4 units (for a maximum of 20 units) may be taken under specific guidelines and with the advance approval of the Senior Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Dean Kulwin).

Within this 16-20 unit limit, you may take up to 14 units in Externships (Law 425, Law 430, Law 445, Law 450, Law 455, Law 460, Law 465, Law 470, Law 475).

B. Unit Guidelines for Externships:

Part Time

Part Time (2-6 units per semester)—Judicial, Federal Taxation, Employment Relations, Public Interest, Intellectual Property, Criminal Justice
Part Time (2-4 units per semester)—Legislative Process, Environmental

All externs must keep records of the time spent at their placements. For each unit of credit received in an externship program, the student shall work at the placement 4 hours per week for the 15 weeks of the semester. See course descriptions for unit guidelines appropriate to each externship.

Enrollment in an externship placement for more than one semester or after employment at the same placement: Students may take externships in subsequent second and third semesters at the discretion of the faculty under the following circumstances: The experience from semester to semester is cumulative and varied, not repetitive, and differs substantially from the work previously undertaken; the nature of the work done could not have been compressed into one semester, or the student's schedule would not permit such intensity. The maximum number of units at any one placement is 12.

Full Time

Full Time Semester Away (12 units)—Judicial, Criminal Justice

Students may enroll only in the Criminal Justice and Judicial externships on a full time basis (12 units per semester).Full-time Judicial externs must take Judicial Process Seminar 261, 2 units, either prior to or concurrently with the externship. The seminar is generally only offered in the fall semester. Generally, students should wait until their fourth or fifth semester to do a full time externship. The student must be in good academic standing. Students will work 40 hours per week for 16 weeks. Thus, if the externship begins on the first day of law school instruction, it will end one week after the last day of law school instruction.

Semester away students may take an additional 2 unit non-clinical/externship class for a total of 14 semester units. With permission of Dean Kulwin, a student may take a 3 unit non-clinical class. If a student elects to take an additional 3 units, he or she will receive only 11 credits for the externship but will still be required to complete 40 hours of work for 16 weeks. Time devoted to course work is in addition to the externship 40 hours per week. The student will receive no more than a total of 14 semester units during any full time externship semester. This limitation cannot be waived.

Credit for Summer Externships

King Hall does not have a summer program or summer classes. However, students have two options:

  • Most major cities have one or more A.B.A. accredited law schools which have summer sessions and which offer externships during those summer sessions. You can apply as a summer visiting student and, if accepted, enroll in the A.B.A. accredited school's summer session and pay that school's summer fees. Please check with the King Hall financial aid office to find out whether financial aid will be available for you.
    • Students who take classes at other A.B.A. accredited schools must earn grades of C or better for the units to be accepted towards the King Hall J.D. Externships are generally graded Pass/Fail or Credit/No Credit. You must find out how the school you attend defines "Pass" or "Credit". If the school defines these terms as the equivalent of a C or better, the law school will accept a grade of "Pass," "Credit" or "Satisfactory" and apply your externship units. If the school defines "Pass," "Credit" or "Satisfactory" as the equivalent of a D- or better (which is the custom of many schools), the law school cannot accept grades of "Pass," "Credit" or "Satisfactory." Instead, the professor overseeing your externship must agree to write a letter saying that your performance in the externship is the equivalent of a C or better (assuming that is true after you have completed the externship). Some schools are willing to write such letters while others are not. Be sure to learn the school's policy on this before enrolling at the school.
    • Students who want to take classes outside of King Hall must obtain approval from Dean Kulwin before registering for the course. To apply, students must complete the [Dean's Approval for Outside Units ] , attach copies of the course descriptions for each course the student wants to take and turn the completed form and course descriptions in to the Registrar's Office.
  • You simply work during the summer at the placement without enrolling in a summer session. In the fall, you enroll at King Hall for a Law 499 (independent research project) under the supervision of a King Hall faculty member and write a paper on a topic that interested you at your summer placement. You can write a paper based on legal issues you learned about while working or use something you wrote at your job as a starting point for your King Hall paper. The choice of topic would be up to you and the supervising King Hall professor. The Law 499 can be either graded or S/U. Note that you would not be getting credit for your work at the externship itself but for a separate project based on your work there. This means that you cannot write something at your job, bring it to a King Hall professor and say "here's my Law 499 project, please grade it." Your Law 499 project must be new work you create under the supervision of the King Hall professor. If you think you might already have ideas for a paper before you start your externship, or you develop an idea during the summer, you can find a professor who agrees to supervise your and begin working on your paper during the summer if you like.