Skip to content

Scott P. Peartree

If we, as part of the school's community, expect others in California to support King Hall, then we, as a group, must be the first to contribute to its success.

Scott Peartree — Class of 2005

The graduating class of 2005 was the first class in recent years to make an organized gift to the UC Davis School of Law. Scott participated in the Class Gift campaign that netted $4,540, with total benefit to the School of $22,562, thanks to the generosity of matching gift-fund donors.

"Given today's political climate, public institutions can no longer depend on taxpayers or politicians distributing tax dollars as reliable supporters of education," Scott says. "Unfortunately, it seems like public universities have to rely more heavily on private sources of funding to maintain a high standard of educational and student-oriented services. It is with this in mind that I gave to King Hall."

While at Davis, Scott was secretary and vice-president of the Law Students Association. Davis offers the combination of an excellent academic reputation and relatively small size," he says. "On top of that, King Hall's reputation as a "friendly" law school should not be underestimated. Students are driven by personal goals to learn and prepare for practice, as opposed to merely topping their classmates." Scott believes this results in "a very productive environment that encourages supportive academic and social interactions among students while still allowing a focus and desire that is fundamental to a traditional law school experience.?

Scott is now working as an associate with Littler Mendelson in Fresno, California. His Annual Fund donation not only leaves a lasting legacy from the Class of 2005, but will support students and innovative, diverse programs; preserve accessibility to a King Hall education; insulate school from state budget cuts; and strengthen the school and increase the value of a King Hall degree.

"If we, as part of the school's community, expect others in California to support King Hall," Scott says, "Then we, as a group, must be the first to contribute to its success."